Adopt a Memory – Civil War Kepi (Cap)

Adopt a Memory – Civil War Kepi (Cap)

$150.00

Adopt a Memory Civil War Kepi (Cap)

Kepi: a military cap with a round flat top usually sloping toward the front and a visor.

History:

While a Curator was working on a project to learn more about Rossiter Kellogg (see: Verdun medal soon to be part of the Adopt a Memory artifacts), a local historian mentioned that we have a Civil War Kepi (cap), which belonged to Robert H Kellogg, Rossiter’s Father.  Robert Kellogg was born in Pennsylvania, lived in Connecticut before the Civil War, was in Andersonville prison during the war then lived and died in Delaware, OH after the war.  He is buried in Oak Grove Cemetery.

According to our historian, Robert H Kellogg was the model for two Civil War statues, which are holding a kepi. The statues are in Hartford, CT and the Andersonville National Park in Georgia.

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Description

This is the cap of a Civil War veteran, who was imprisoned in the infamous Andersonville prison.

Kepi: a military cap with a round flat top usually sloping toward the front and a visor

(Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/kepi Viewed 12/13/2020)

History: While a Curator was working on a project to learn more about Rossiter Kellogg (see: Verdun medal soon to be part of the Adopt a Memory artifacts), a local historian mentioned that we have a Civil War Kepi (hat), which belonged to Robert H Kellogg, Rossiter’s Father.  Robert Kellogg was born in Pennsylvania, lived in Connecticut before the Civil War, was in Andersonville prison during the war then lived and died in Delaware, OH after the war.  He is buried in Oak Grove Cemetery.AAM Civil War Kepi statue

According to our historian, Robert H Kellogg was the model for two Civil War statues, where he is holding a kepi. The statues are in Hartford, CT and the Andersonville National Park in Georgia.

The plaque  at Andersonville National Park reads: IN MEMORY OF THE MEN OF CONNECTICUT WHO SUFFERED IN SOUTHERN MILITARY PRISONS 1861-1865 (Andersonville statue pictured at right click to see monument )

 

It was not in the heat and excitement of battle that these men gave up life. No cheer of victory roused them as their souls took flight, but in the loneliness of multitude, with a comrade only by their side, within the enemy’s lines and under a hostile flag, these sons of our beloved state passed to their great reward.
—Robert Kellogg of Connecticut

Story of a Survivor:

Colonel Francis Beach commanded the 16th Connecticut Infantry at the Battle of Antietam. The regiment was only two weeks off the train from Connecticut. It was almost totally innocent of military training and experience when it was thrown into the fight. They had loaded their muskets for the first time on the day before the battle.

The 16th Connecticut had crossed Antietam Creek and was advancing through a field of tall corn up the hill toward Sharpsburg when it was struck in the flank by A.P. Hill’s surprise counterattack. The regiment lost a quarter of its men killed and wounded in the confusion and retreat that followed. Robert Kellogg received a slight wound to his arm. (Click to see monument and additional information  Antietam 16th Connecticut)

Exactly 19 months later, the 16th Connecticut faced its second major engagement of the war, and this time things seemed entirely different. The men were more experienced and hardened, less idealistic about war. But they were no more prepared for a Confederate onslaught than they were on that fateful day in Maryland. And the results, like at Antietam, were devastating. Rather than panicking and fleeing, the regiment—and the entire Federal garrison—was surrounded and captured. (Click to see story of the 16th Connecticut infantry)

Robert Hale Kellogg was sent to and survived the infamous Andersonville prison.

The Delaware County Historical Society transcribed Robert H Kellogg’s diaries and published them for sale by the Society.

The Civil War Kepi resides in the Cryder Library.